AskDefine | Define om

User Contributed Dictionary

English

Alternative spellings

Etymology

From Sanskrit .

Pronunciation

/ɒm/, /əʊm/

Noun

  1. In the context of "Hinduism|Buddhism": A sacred, mystical syllable used in prayer and meditation.

Translations

  • Chinese:
  • Sanskrit: (IAST oṃ)
  • Tibetan:

Etymology

lang=la

Pronunciation

Noun

  1. man, person

Catalan

Etymology

ulmus

Noun

  1. elm

Adjective

om

Danish

Preposition

om

Dutch

Preposition

om
  1. at
  2. around, about
  3. in order to

Preposition

  1. in (after a period of time)

Romanian

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

homo. Compare Catalan home, Esperanto homo, French homme, Interlingua homine, Italian uomo, Portuguese homem, Sardinian ómine, Spanish hombre.

Noun

  1. man, e.g. male
  2. human being
Declension
Synonyms
Antonyms
Derived terms
Related terms

Etymology 2

Auxiliary verb form

Verb

  1. (we) might
    om merge mâine undeva
    we might go somewhere tomorrow

Swedish

Pronunciation

Conjunction

om

Preposition

om
  1. about
    en bok om tåg = a book about trains
  2. in italbrac when talking about time
    om tio minuter = in ten minutes
  3. around
    Han har ett rep om sin hals = He's got a rope around his neck
  4. during, in
    om våren = during the spring, in the springtime
    om kvällarna = in the evenings
  5. of
    till vänster om kylskåpet = to the left of the refrigerator

Extensive Definition

Aum (also Om) is a mystical or sacred syllable in the Hindu, Jain and Buddhist religions. It is placed at the beginning of most Hindu texts as a sacred exclamation to be uttered at the beginning and end of a reading of the Vedas or previously to any prayer or mantra and also is said in the beginning of any puja (religious ritual). The Mandukya Upanishad is entirely devoted to the explanation of the syllable.

Origin, name and written symbols

With preceding a or ā, the o of om in Sanskrit grammar in sandhi (Sanskrit: संधि, "joining") does not form vriddhi (au) but guna (o) per 6.1.95.
The Sanskrit name for the syllable is , from a root "to shout, sound, praise", verbal being attested as "to make a humming or droning sound" in the Brahmanas, and taking the specific meaning of "to utter the syllable om" in the Chandogya Upanishad and the Shrauta Sutras. More rarely used terms are or , and in later times becomes prevalent.
A popular depiction of the Aum syllable in the Devanagari script (In Advaita philosophy it is frequently used to represent three subsumed into one, a common theme in Hinduism. It implies that our current existence is mithyā and maya, "falsehood", that in order to know the full truth we must comprehend beyond the body and intellect the true nature of infinity. Essentially, upon moksha (mukti, samadhi) one is able not only to see or know existence for what it is, but to become it. When one gains true knowledge, there is no split between knower and known: one becomes knowledge/consciousness itself. In essence, Aum is the signifier of the ultimate truth that all is one.
Examples of Three into One:
  • Creation (Brahma)- Preservation (Vishnu)- Destruction (Shiva) into Brahman
  • Waking- Dreaming- Dreamless Sleep into Turiya (transcendental fourth state of consciousness)
  • Rajas (activity, heat, fire) - Tamas (dullness, ignorance, darkness) - Sattva (purity, light, serenity/shanti) into Brahman
  • Body, Speech and Mind into Oneness

In proper names

When Aum is a part of a place name (for example Omkareshwar), or is used as a man's name, it is spelled phonetically using ordinary letters of whatever Indian alphabet is used in the area. The adherents of Arya Samaj always use the ordinary letters अ, ऊ and म to write Aum.

In Jainism

In Jainism, Aum is regarded to be a condensed form of reference to the five parameshthis, by their initials A+A+A+U+M (). The Dravyasamgrah quotes a Prakrit line:
"Aum" is one syllable made from the initials of the five parameshthis. It has been said: "Arihanta, Ashiri, Acharya, Upadhyaya, Muni" .
Thus, () is a short form of the Navkar Mantra.

In Buddhism

Buddhists place om at the beginning of their Vidya-Sadaksari or mystical formulary in six syllables (viz., om mani padme hum) As a seed syllable (bija mantra), it is also considered holy in Esoteric Buddhism.
With Buddhism's evolution and breaking away from Vedic/Hindu tradition, Aum and other symbology/cosmology/philosophies are shared with the Hindu tradition. This character often appeared as "" in Buddhist scripts in East Asia.
om in Arabic: أُم
om in Bengali: ওঁ
om in Czech: Óm
om in Danish: Aum
om in German: Om
om in Spanish: Om
om in French: Om̐
om in Icelandic: Om
om in Italian: Aum
om in Hebrew: אום (הינדו)
om in Kannada: ಓಂ
om in Georgian: აუმ
om in Lithuanian: Om
om in Hungarian: Aum
om in Malayalam: ഓം
om in Dutch: Om (mantra)
om in Japanese: オーム (聖音)
om in Norwegian: Om
om in Norwegian Nynorsk: Aum
om in Polish: Om (mantra)
om in Portuguese: Om
om in Russian: Ом (индуизм)
om in Simple English: Aum
om in Slovak: Óm
om in Finnish: Om-tavu
om in Swedish: Aum
om in Tamil: ஓம்
om in Turkish: Om
om in Chinese: 唵
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